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Juneteenth Re-Opening of The Robbins House!
June 19-September 6: Open 6 days/wk (closed Tuesdays)
September 10-October 31: Open Fridays/Saturdays/Sundays & Indigenous
Peoples’ Day Monday Oct. 11 th
From 11 am – 4 pm
Six visitors allowed inside the Robbins House at a time
Masks required by visitors until further notice

Visit The Robbins House

June, July & August: 11-4
(Closed Tuesdays)
September, October: 11-4
(Open Fri-Sun + Columbus Day)

320 Monument Street
Concord MA
(Located opposite the Old North Bridge)

(978) 254-1745

Caesar Robbins

c. 1745 – 1822, 77 years

FIGHTING FOR INDEPENDENCE
Enslaved at birth in nearby Chelmsford, Caesar Robbins served in two wars. At 16, he served in the French and Indian War; his enslaver received his payment. In his early 30s, Caesar fought in the Revolutionary War and gained his emancipation. In 1776, Caesar served under Captain Israel Heald to fortify Boston’s Dorchester Heights. In August 1776 he marched to Fort Ticonderoga in upstate New York, and enlisted for the last time in 1779.

FREEDOM AND FAMILY
1784 records show that Caesar, age 40, was the head of a household in Carlisle. By 1790, he was farming and living on a small plot of land in Concord owned by Humphrey Barrett. Caesar married twice and had six children. He died in 1822. The following year, his son Peter Robbins purchased over 13 acres and this newly built home from Barrett. In 1823, Caesar’s children Peter and Susan became the first residents of the Robbins house.

(representational image)

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